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Press releases originate from Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Oregon, and from the partners working with LCBO.

Corps of Discovery II on Lewis and Clark Trail with Umatilla

(Pendleton, OR) – As they had so often along the journey, the Lewis and Clark Expedition 200 years ago found local hospitality key to continuing what was now their return to the United States. From April 29 through May 7, Corps of Discovery II: 200 Years to the Future, will enjoy the hospitality of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla at Tamastslikt Cultural Institute and continue the commemoration of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial.

In the spring of 1806 as Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark brought their expedition upstream along the Columbia River. They met Walla Walla chief Yelleppit who urged his own people to share food and fuel with the travelers. He also traded Clark a beautiful white horse for the captain’s sword.

But the most valuable item imparted to the crew during their few days among the Walla Walla and neighboring Yakama was information: news of an overland short cut that saved Lewis and Clark an 80-mile struggle from the Columbia up the Snake River back to the Clearwater River and their horses being kept by the Nez Perce.

Stories of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla will be highlighted at Corps of Discovery II when the nation’s only mobile national park sets up at Tamastslikt Cultural Institute near the Wildhorse Resort just outside Pendleton. Hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission to Corps II is free.

Corps of Discovery II is not a celebration, rather a commemoration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, said Betty Boyko, Assistant Superintendent of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. “Corps II is an opportunity for people to hear many sides of the Lewis and Clark story.

“This opportunity especially includes stories from a Native American perspective. These are stories of the impacts and consequences of westward U.S. expansion that followed Lewis and Clark and stories about the future of these and all Americans,” Boyko said.

Corps of Discovery II is a multi-station exhibit designed to get visitors involved in the Lewis and Clark story and show what life along the Trail was like before, during and after Lewis and Clark passed through. Corps II has a walk-through tent to provide an overview of the original 1803-06 journey. It contains maps, artwork, graphics and an audio program to describe the route across the continent, encounters between cultures, even details like what a soldier’s uniform looked like 200 years ago.

Corps of Discovery II has a replica keelboat, about two-thirds the size of the original watercraft Lewis and Clark had in their first year of the tour, from St. Louis to Fort Mandan. The exhibit has a 16-foot diameter Plains Indian lodge, or tipi, and an explorer campsite and 28-foot ponderosa pine dugout canoe. Steve Morehouse of the Bureau of Reclamation hosts visitors at the explorer camp. He does fire-starting demonstrations, shows tools and weapons of the early 1800s, often cooks corn meal mush and an occasional beaver tail for sampling.

The Tent of Many Voices is the heart of Corps II, said Kevin Crisler, manager of the exhibit. The nine-day venue reads like a Who’s Who of Lewis and Clark Bicentennial historians, tribal elders, musicians and storytellers. While at Tamastslikt, Corps II presenters include Tamastslikt Cultural Institute director Bobbie Conner, Rod Ariwite, Hasan Davis, Daniel Slosberg, Ritchie Doyle, Jack Gladstone, Alanna Nanegos, Cheryl and Gene Shippentower, Gary Lentz, Robert Miller, Jim Dillman, Jenny Barnett, Arleen Adams, Tom Bailor and Stuart Harris, along with National Park Service, Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interpretive rangers.

Tamastslikt is the 82nd stop on the Corps of Discovery nationwide tour. More than 450,000 people have visited Corps II along the Lewis and Clark Trail between Monticello and the Pacific Ocean. The tour concludes this fall in St. Louis, 200 years to the date Lewis and Clark returned.

The Tent of Many Voices schedule is available online at www.lewisclarkandbeyond.com and is also available at Corps of Discovery II.

Editors: for photos and video tape call Public Information Officer Jeff Olson 402-689-7431 or email jeffrey_olson@nps.gov

For immediate release
Contact: Jeffrey G. Olson, Public Information Officer
Phone: 402-689-7431 – cell; 402-661-1820 – office
Date: April 26, 2006

Corps of Discovery II posted on 27 April 2006. Download press release.


Tamástslikt Cultural Institute

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Charles Denight, TEL 541-966-1973, charles.denight@wildhorseresort.com

April 29 – May 7, 2006

Corps of Discovery in Our Camp: Tradition of Hospitality and Trade comes to the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, Pendleton, Oregon

The Indian role in the famed Lewis & Clark expedition, now marking its 200th anniversary, is a key story in the current bicentennial commemoration of the Expedition. That will be especially evident when Corps of Discovery II: 200 Years to the Future, sets up its big-top style tents at the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute near Pendleton, April 29-May 7, 2006.

During the Corps II nine-day appearance, the Corps II exhibits and performance stage, as well as Tamástslikt’s permanent exhibits and its outside living culture village, will be open to the public with free admission. Hours are 9-5 daily.

The nine days of events open Friday, April 28 with a lively concert by Odyssey West from 5:30 - 7 p.m. As with all events during the Corp II stay, it will be free and open to the public.

Tamástslikt will enhance the visit by providing other displays—a presentation of live raptor birds native to our region as well as a display of butterflies.

In Tamástslikt's living culture village visitors can learn the stick game, an ancient gambling pastime, observe the techniques of flintknapping and tule mat construction and taste freshly cooked beaver's tail while experiencing the village's forms of traditional Tribal lodges going back over 1,000 years.

A myriad of presentations, music and historical interpretations will take place during nine days. See the accompanying story and schedule for details.

While American Indians have no wish to celebrate the Lewis and Clark Expedition—it ushered in a period of upheaval and cultural destruction for Western Tribes, even to the point of extinction for some—most of the Tribal governments who represent the descendents of the Tribes encountered by the Expedition have chosen to join in the commemoration. They recognize it as an opportunity to tell their own history of the Expedition and the ensuing events.

Corps II, the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial exhibit on wheels produced by the National Park Service, gives visitors an introduction to the Lewis & Clark expedition story. It began its tour in January 2003 at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, who sent the original expedition. Several Tamástslikt staff, including director Bobbie Conner, participated in that snowy launch of the four-year commemoration. Since then the Corps II exhibit has set up in communities on approximately the dates the expedition passed through their regions 200 years ago.

The exhibit relates to the natural history, cultural resources and people of our nation before, during and after the Lewis & Clark Expedition. The 200-seat Tent of Many Voices hosts live demonstrations, lectures, cultural presentations and audio-visual showings (see the accompanying schedule) provided in partnership with the Tribes here, as well as other local Lewis & Clark bicentennial organizations and state agencies.

"Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery arrived in this region 200 years ago,” said Bobbie Conner, director of Tamástslikt. “Our people helped them with food, directions, information and transportation.” Conner is the vice-president of the National Council of the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial and will be a presenter in the Tent of Many Voices while it’s here. She has joined the Corps II exhibit at several of its stops during the past two years to speak on the Indian role in the expedition and its impact on the many tribes it encountered.

Betty Boyko, Assistant Superintendent of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, said Lewis and Clark noted rivers teeming with fish and thousands of people living in the area of the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers. “But what happened to the tribes after Lewis and Clark was unkind at best,” she said. “That’s a large part of the story we are going to look at when Corps II is at Tamástslikt.”

Conner said the captains saw thousands of pounds of drying fish, healthy horses, handsome and respected leadership, heard multiple native languages, “and of our people they said, 'they are the most hospitable, honest and sincere people that have met with in our voyage.' ”

But over the years those words of praise did not insulate the Tribes. "President Jefferson and the founding fathers charted the course, the Lewis and Clark expedition mapped and branded the route, and treaty commissioners imposed their national rights of discovery on Indians who had few choices and none favorable,” Connor added.

In addition to a walk-through exhibit, Corps of Discovery II has a 25-foot keelboat replica, an explorer camp complete with a 25-foot dugout canoe and a performance stage.

Corps II is largely staffed by the National Park Service but involves more than two dozen federal agencies, 41 Indian nations, 18 Lewis and Clark Trail State Commissions, dozens of state and local agencies, non-profit groups and thousands of individual volunteers. More than 300,000 people have visited Corps II in over 70 cities near and along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

The Tent of Many Voices schedule and more Corps II information is available online at www.lewisandclarkgnet.com and www.nps.gov/lecl.

For further information about the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial please visit www.lewisandclark200.org or www.lewisandclark200.gov or www.lcbo.net.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute is located at Wildhorse Resort & Casino, 10 minutes east of Pendleton. From Interstate 84 take exit 216 and follow the signs five minutes to Wildhorse Resort and the Institute. Coming from the north, take the Mission exit from Highway 11 just northeast of Pendleton and follow the signs for about ten minutes to the Wildhorse Resort and the Institute. Tamástslikt is open 7 days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to exhibits telling the story of the three Tribes' history and culture, there is also a Museum Store and the Kinship Café.

Tent of Many Voices Speaks in Many Tongues

Entertainers, scientists, historians, park rangers and more will bring one of America’s premier historical stories to life for nine days beginning April 29.

Corps of Discovery II, the National Park Service exhibit touring the country as part of the Lewis and Clark Expedition Bicentennial commemoration, will again appear at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute from April 29 – May 7, including dozens of live appearances on the stage of the Tent of Many Voices.

At each of its hundreds of appearances over the past three years, the Corps II exhibit has taken on a new personality, provided by the unique venue where it is staged. While appearing at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, the Tribal museum and interpretive center for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation near Pendleton, the Park Service’s exhibit will have a decidedly Native feel.

In many ways the Lewis and Clark Expedition marked the beginning of the end for hundreds of Native Tribes’ cultures, as they had been practiced for thousands of years. So while the exhibit at Tamástslikt will include a lot of fun, it will also include presentations on the impact of the expedition on Tribal life in the Columbia Plateau region.

Among the presentations in the Tent of Many Voices will be such scientific-oriented programs as “Plants and Fish of the Umatilla River”, the “Story of the Sage Grouse” and the “Environmental Legacy of the Columbia Plateau”. Everyone will enjoy learning the traditional stick game, a fun form of Native gambling that’s been practiced for many centuries and was often observed and noted by Lewis and Clark.

Jack Gladstone, a Blackfeet musician most often found wiith a guitar in his hands, will tell the story of the Blackfeet encounter, the only encounter between the Expedition and Native Americans to result in violence and death. Other presentations connected to the Native story include a symposium on the Longterm Impact of the Expedtion on Tribes in this Region, a presentation on the Health Status of American Indians, another on the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act and Songs of the Umatilla and the story of the local Tribes’ Salmon Culture.

Historical presentations include First Do No Harm (Medicine of the Expedition), the story of Meriwether Lewis told in Meriwether’s words by an actor portraying the expedition leaders, The Fates of Corps Members After 1806, and a play, The End of the World, about Lewis’ death by suicide a few years after the expedition.

Hasan Davis, who has acquired national fame portraying the Black slave, York, will portray York at Tamástslikt, even as he has at the White House. Daniel Slosberg, renowned for his portrayal of the expedition’s most famous fiddler, Pierre Cruzatte, will touch his bow to the fiddle strings while also telling Cruzatte’s story in a musical presentation, and Ritchie Doyle, famed interpreter of William Clark, will portray the expedition’s co-captain, complete with red hair.

For a complete list of the events and more details, visit www.tamastslikt.com.

Odyssey West Show

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Charles Denight, TEL 541-966-1973, charles.denight@wildhorseresort.com

With their multimedia show, Odyssey West, Jack Gladstone, left, and Rob Quist, will open
the nine-day appearance at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute of the National Park Service
exhibit Corps of Discovery II, April 29-May 7. The show is Fri., April 28, 5:30-7:30 and is
free and open to the public.

Odyssey West, a visual and musical multimedia performance by Rob Quist and Jack Gladstone, will kickoff the nine-day appearance of Corps of Discovery II at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute. The concert on Fri., April 28 from 5:30-7:30pm is free and open to the public.

Corps II is an exhibit and performance program of the National Park Service about the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A full schedule of activities for the nine days can be found at www.tamastslikt.com.

In a two-hour performance, Quist and Gladstone provide comedy, commentary and music keyed to Lewis & Clark. Gladstone and Quist literally bring the West to life with the rich historical content of their original songs and narratives presented with haunting photographic and artistic images of the Old and New West. They presented their show in January, 2003 at the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial kick off at Thomas Jefferson's Virginia home and have since performed at venues across the country.

Gladstone, a member of the Blackfeet Tribe, and Quist, a Montana rancher’s son, take their audience on a powerful journey through the divergent paths traveled by the Indian and White Man, yet the message is one of hope as the paths converge with a vision for all.

Named by the Missoulian as “One of Montana’s Notable Musicians of the Twentieth Century,” Quist has released eight CD’s. Gladstone attended the University of Washington on a football scholarship, earning a Rose Bowl ring with the 1978 championship Huskies. Since 1988, he has released several critically acclaimed, independently produced CD’s. His release, Buffalo Republic, was honored with an entry-level nomination for the 2001 Grammy Awards and was nominated for Folk Recording and Historical Album of the Year by the Native American Music Awards.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute is located at Wildhorse Resort & Casino, 10 minutes east of Pendleton. From Interstate 84 take exit 216 and follow the signs five minutes to Wildhorse Resort and the Institute. Coming from the north, take the Mission exit from Highway 11 just northeast of Pendleton and follow the signs for about ten minutes to the Wildhorse Resort and the Institute. Tamástslikt is open 7 days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to exhibits telling the story of the three Tribes' history and culture, there is also a Museum Store and the Kinship Café.

For more information: 541-966-9748 or www.tamastslikt.com. Direct dial the museum store at tollfree 1-866-282-2022. Tamástslikt is owned and operated by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute events posted 19 April 2006. Download PDF of press release. Download Odyssey West event press release.


AN ARTWORK SPANNING 450 MILES BEGINS TO UNFOLD, BRINGING TOGETHER ART AND NATURE, PEOPLES AND CULTURES

April 22 Event at Cape Disappointment State Park, Washington, Celebrates
Achievement of the First of Seven Permanent Installations by Artist Maya Lin

ILWACO, WA – The place where Lewis and Clark reached the end of their westward journey now marks the starting point of the Confluence Project.

On Saturday, April 22, 2006, where the Columbia River flows into the Pacific Ocean, dignitaries from Native American tribes and the State of Washington will celebrate the achievement of the first of seven ambitious installations, designed by world-renowned artist Maya Lin for the non-profit Confluence Project. Drums will sound and songs will rise, as guests go in procession through an historic site that Lin’s art has renewed and transformed.

From here, at Washington’s Cape Disappointment State Park, the Confluence Project is working eastward along the route taken two centuries ago by Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery. When the last of the installations is finished, in 2008, Lin and the Confluence Project will have achieved one of the largest environmental art initiatives in history, and one of the most significant. The Project will help restore habitats in federal and state lands in Washington and Oregon—from the rich salt-water estuary at Cape Disappointment to the arid steppe some 450 miles up river—while creating new ways to think about, and experience, the changing life of this landscape.

Launched in 2000 through a collaboration of Native American and other groups, the Confluence Project is an initiative to reclaim and reimagine the landscape along the historic Columbia River basin through permanent art installations by Maya Lin. Each site along the course of the Project is a place where waterways merge, indigenous peoples have gathered, or contact occurred between Native Americans and Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery. Through Maya Lin’s creative interventions into their history and terrain, these sites will now offer new points of encounter between the natural world and the built environment, the past and the present, for people of all backgrounds.
Participants in the April 22 ceremony will be the first to appreciate fully how Lin has drawn together two areas of Cape Disappointment—the bay side and the ocean side—into a single, steadily unfolding experience. Contemporary in character but deeply sensitive to its environment, Lin’s installation is a subtle yet powerful arrangement of indigenous materials and natural forms, Native American words and symbols and texts from Lewis and Clark’s journals, leading visitors into a new relationship with this landscape and its ongoing story.

On the bay side, where visitors previously found a utilitarian sink and asphalt parking lot, there are now restored wetlands, an open platform that invites you out to the waters of Baker Bay, and a massive, elegant fish-cutting table, made of polished native basalt inscribed with a Chinook creation legend. On the opposite side of the park, a redesigned amphitheater offers views out to the Pacific Ocean. From one side of the amphitheater, a boardwalk inscribed with texts from Lewis and Clark’s journals (summarizing their entire westward journey from St. Louis to the Pacific) brings visitors to the beach. From the other side of the amphitheater, a pathway of crushed oyster shells, inscribed with a Chinook praise song recited on this site in 2005, 200 years to the day after the arrival of Lewis and Clark, leads to a secluded grove, where Maya Lin has erected a circle of silvery cedar driftwood found nearby. Six cedar columns surround a cedar tree trunk that is older than the history of Lewis and Clark, to evoke the seven directions of Native American tradition: north, south, east, west, up, down, and in.

Connecting the bay side and ocean side of the site is an “ecological trail,” now being developed by Washington State’s Park Services, which will traverse five ecosystems and reveal to visitors the teeming life, and incalculable importance, of an area that has been one of the world’s great salt-water estuaries.

Celebrating the achievement of this first stage of the Confluence Project on April 22 will include Gary Johnson, Chairman of the Chinook Tribal Council; Kathleen Sayce, Confluence Project Board representative from Pacific County; Jane Jacobsen, Executive Director of the Confluence Project; and Maya Lin.

“What if you were to think of a place not as a still, fixed point in time,” Maya Lin asks, “but rather as a moving, fluid site? You can see the Confluence Project this way, not just as seven separate artworks but also as one, which encompasses the life and flow of the whole Columbia River Basin and the story of Lewis and Clark’s journey through this land. Each area along the way is designed as a walk, a passage, in itself, and each is embedded with texts from Lewis and Clark’s journals. The historic record is pulled apart, distributed over a 450-mile route, and incorporated into the real space and time of the river.”

“The Confluence Project is truly an expedition of its own, undertaken by many different people, with Maya Lin as the visionary guide,” states Jane Jacobsen. “We have begun our trip here, at Cape Disappointment, because Maya saw this was the best place to hold up a mirror to Lewis and Clark’s journey—as if we were looking back not in time but in space, along the route they traveled. We may see it from different perspectives, depending on who we are. But for all of us who have come together through this Project, that route has now acquired a second meaning, as the direction in which we’re heading.”

The other sites selected for the Confluence Project, from west to east, are the confluence of the Willamette and the Columbia in Clark County, WA; Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Vancouver, WA; the Sandy River Delta, near Troutdale, OR; Celilo Falls Park, near The Dalles, OR; Sacajawea State Park, Pasco, WA; and Chief Timothy Park, west of Clarkston, WA. Each will benefit from ecological restoration, and at each Ms. Lin will use the site’s historic and ecological identity to frame a new way of experiencing the place, giving visitors a different and closer connection to the land. Her interventions will vary from a “sky bowl” amphitheater inscribed with a Nez Perce text, to a bird-viewing platform etched with the names of the species Lewis and Clark encountered, to an arc-shaped “land bridge” designed in collaboration with the Seattle-based architect Johnpaul Jones.

The Confluence Project is the result of collaboration among the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, the Nez Perce Tribe, the Lewis and Clark Commemorative Committee of Vancouver/Clark County, and the Friends of Lewis and Clark of Pacific County. Each group identified Maya Lin as the artist who could best imagine, and realize, this unprecedented initiative.
Materials relating to the Confluence Project are one element of the exhibition Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes, on view from April 22 through October 1, 2006, and the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, WA. Encompassing large-scale installations, recent sculptures, and drawings, the exhibition is the first that has carefully translated the scale and coherence of Maya Lin’s outdoor installations to the interior space of a museum. For information on Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes, the public may phone 206.543.2280 or visit www.henryart.org.

To learn more about the Confluence Project, visit www.confluenceproject.org.

For further press information:

Jane Jacobsen
Confluence Project
360-693-0123
jane@confluenceproject.org

Janet Gallimore
Confluence Project
360-693-0123
jang@confluenceproject.org

Briana Miller
The Kreisberg Group, Ltd.
212.799.5515, ext. 204
Briana@KreisbergGroup.com

Misha Calvert
The Kreisberg Group, Ltd.
212.799.5515, ext. 203
Misha@KreisbergGroup.com

Posted 4 April 2006. Download PDF of press release.


An Opening to Close: Port of Portland and National Park Service
Will Dedicate a New Historic Trail as Oregon’s Celebration
of the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Comes to an End

CONTACTS: Elisa Dozono, 503-944-7061
Port of Portland

Chip Jenkins, 503-861-4401
Lewis & Clark Nat’l Historical Park

WHAT: Ribbon-cutting ceremony to dedicate the new Netul Trail built in partnership by the Lewis & Clark National Historical Park and the Port of Portland. The 1.5-mile trail enables visitors to follow in the footsteps of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark along the banks of the Lewis & Clark River, where wildlife such as bald eagles and river otters still abound. A group of 33 re-enactors will lead a procession to the path’s end at the same canoe landing used by Lewis & Clark 200 years ago to the day to start their journey home from their winter at Ft. Clatsop.

WHO: Fran Mainella, Director, National Park Service
Bill Wyatt, Executive Director, Port of Portland

WHERE: Fort Clatsop, ASTORIA
The trail begins at the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center. The dedication site will be approximately 200 yards from the visitor center on the boardwalk and bridge next to the historic Canoe Landing.

WHEN: Thursday, March 23, 2006
11:30 a.m.

BACKGROUND: The trail dedication is part of the “Return Home” weekend commemorating the close of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial on the Pacific Coast. The Netul Landing runs just south of Fort Clatsop and is a relatively new addition to the park. Once a former log sort yard, Netul Landing provides views of wildlife along the Lewis and Clark River. Visitors can see the life sized sculpture of Sacagawea and use the interpretive panels that provide information on the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the Native Americans of the Lower Columbia River. Netul Landing also serves as a canoe/kayak launch for the Lower Columbia River Water Trail.

Posted 22 March 2006. Download PDF of press release.


Construction of Officers Quarters To Begin
At Fort Clatsop

Construction of the walls of the new Officers Quarters at Fort Clatsop will begin on Thursday, March 9. The walls of the Enlisted Men’s Quarters were completed on February 25th. Logs previously cut, notched and fit together, then sent for preservative treatment, will begin to be assembled to form walls of the Officer’s Quarters.

Volunteers are needed Thursday, Friday, and Saturday to help to haul the logs to the construction site. Work will start at Noon on Thursday, and at 9 AM on Friday and Saturday.

“We are hoping that people that have been thinking about working on the Fort Rebuild, take the opportunity to be a part of history.” Said Chip Jenkins, Superintendent. “This will be something you will be able to tell your kids about.”

Work on assembling the Officer’s Quarters is expected to last up to a week.

“The area around the construction site will be open and we want people to come out and watch the work on the new Fort.” Jenkins said. “We will have park rangers on hand to help answer questions and give programs.”

Walls for both structures will be up in time for the final Lewis and Clark Bicentennial event, The Return Home which will be March 23 to 26 at Fort Clatsop. A ceremony, marking the bicentennial of the Corps of Discovery’s departure from Fort Clatsop, the return of the walls of the new Fort Clatsop and the dedication of the new Netul River Trail will be on March 23 between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM.

People that would like to volunteer to help bring the logs of Fort Clatsop home can call to schedule time to be part of the work crew. This will ensure that people will have a chance to help and make the best use of their valuable volunteer time. Volunteers can schedule their work time by calling (503) 861-4400.

Posted 6 March 2006. Download PDF of press release.


Lewis and Clark and the International Competition for Oregon

Clatsop County Historical Society
714 Exchange Street PO Box 88
Astoria, Oregon 97103
Telephone (503) 325-2203

The Clatsop County Historical Society is pleased to sponsor an Oregon Chautauqua program by Mark Eifler entitled “Lewis and Clark and the International Competition for Oregon”. This free, public program will take place on Thursday, March 2nd at 7:00 pm in the Edwin K. Parker Gallery of the Heritage Museum, 1618 Exchange Street, Astoria.

The Pacific Northwest coast was a hotbed of international competition between 1775 and 1815, when four nations—Spain, Russian, Great Britain, and the United States—sought control of the region. By the time of the Lewis and Cark Expedition, it was apparent that the key to regional dominance focused on the mouth of the Columbia River. Most students of American history are familiar with the scientific goals President Jefferson established for Corps of Discovery, but Jefferson also had his eye on political and economic power as he sought to map the vast territory recently purchased from France.

Although the Expedition did not make direct contact with representatives of the other nations, historian Mark Eifler will discuss the remarkable geopolitical ramifications of Lewis and Clark's journey: the end of Spain's already weak hold on the Pacific Northwest, a frenzy of Russian activity to seize the coast, and a further opening of the door for British fur traders.

Mr. Eifler's program is made possible by funding from the Oregon Council for the Humanities, an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. “TNT” Thursday Night Talks is a free monthly lecture series held the first Thursday of each month featuring a variety of topics and speakers.

For more information about this event or other Clatsop County Historical Society activities, please call 503-325-2203 or e-mail: cchs@seasurf.net.


Corps of Discovery II opens 2006 tour in St. Helens, OR

(St. Helens, OR) – The original Corps of Volunteers for Northwestern Discovery spent most of March 1806 in final preparation for their return to the United States. Those final days at Fort Clatsop meant wind, rain, hail and snow, making moccasins, the never-ending search for food and one of the low points of the journey, the theft of a Clatsop canoe.

These and other stories of the Lewis and Clark Expedition unfold at Corps of Discovery II: 200 Years to the Future on the waterfront at Cowlitz and Strand in St, Helens March 13-20.

Led by the National Park Service, Corps of Discovery II will be on the St. Helens riverfront to join the regional “Campfires and Canoes” bicentennial commemoration where additional waterfront activities are planned with a gala dinner, vendor booths and school tours.

“The first three years of Corps of Discovery II have been packed with adventure but there is more awaiting us as we make the return trip to St. Louis,” said Betty Boyko, Assistant Superintendent of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and Corps of Discovery II. “Our line up of speakers in the Tent of Many Voices, new ranger program and meeting new visitors to Corps II really illustrates what lies ahead for the final leg of our journey across America.”

Admission to Corps II is free. Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

The Tent of Many Voices is a spotlight for Bicentennial commemorative programs. The big tent seats up to 165 people in its winter configuration. Corps of Discovery II also has a walk-through exhibit that gives visitors an overview of the 1803-06 expedition.

Programs in the Tent of Many Voices bring to life more than 200 years of history and culture of people living along the Lewis and Clark Trail before, during and after the 1803-06 expedition.

In St. Helen’s, Corps II speakers include Lewis and Marilyn Malatare of Toppenish, WA, award-winning storyteller Ed Edmo who is from Warm Springs, Oregon and Shoshone-Bannock. Roger Wendlick of Portland portrays George Druoillard, the lead hunter of the expedition and visitors will hear from Ray Gardner, vice president of the Chinook Nation and longtime educator Cliff Snyder of the Chinook Nation. Amy Mossett of Bismarck, N.D., will be interpreting Sacagawea, local historian R.J. Brown will share stories of expedition member George Shannon, Mike Iyall of the Cowlitz Nation will bring stories of Cowlitz history and culture. There are programs on the rebuilding of Fort Clatsop and much, much more.

Corps II also has a two-thirds size keelboat where visitors can sample what life was like for the crew during the journey from St. Louis to Fort Mandan and return. The 16-foot diameter Plains Indian lodge or tipi is another interpretive station where NPS rangers give programs about life along the trail. Corps II has an explorer camp where park ranger Steve Morehouse of the Bureau of Reclamation demonstrates skills Expedition members brought to or learned while on the 1803-06 journey. Morehouse has a 25-foot dugout canoe that has been in the water at points along the entire Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

The Tent of Many Voices schedule is available online at www.lewisandclarkgnet.com and www.nps.gov/lecl and at Corps II.

Corps II is led by and largely funded by the National Park Service but it involves more than two dozen federal agencies, 41 Indian nations, 18 Lewis and Clark Trail State Commissions, dozens of state and local agencies, non-profit groups and thousands of individual volunteers.

The exhibit is on a four-year tour of the United States that began in January 2003 at Monticello, the home of President Jefferson. More than 425,000 people have visited Corps II in 75 cities near and along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Editors: for photos and video tape call Jeff Olson 402-689-7431 or email jeffrey_olson@nps.gov
For further information about Corps II and the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial please visit us at www.nps.gov/lecl or www.lewisandclark200.org or www.lewisandclark200.gov

Posted 23 February 2006. Download PDF of press release.


STAMP CANCELLATION

SEASIDE POST OFFICE OFFERS A SPECIAL STAMP CANCELLATION
DURING THE SALTMAKERS RETURN
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

ASTORIA, OR – The Saltmakers Return to Seaside February 17 – 19 as part of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Wintering Over programs. To help commemorate this event the United States Post Office is offering a special stamp cancellation on Saturday, February 18, from 11 am to 2 pm. Visitors to The Saltmakers encampment on the beach in Seaside can bring their own items for cancellation or purchase items offered by the U.S. Post Office and the Seaside Museum and Historical Society. A Salt Works stamp cancellation has been specially designed with cancellations taking place at the information tent. The Seaside Museum will also have cancelled products for sale at its Museum Store located at 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside.

The Saltmakers Return is a fun interactive learning opportunity for the whole family. Visitors to this 56-hour event are encouraged to talk and trade with members of the expedition while these soldiers are tending fires and boiling seawater to make salt.

It was here, exactly 200 years ago this winter, members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition had a salt making camp about 15 miles from their Fort Clatsop headquarters. The salt was obtained from seawater by boiling the water away and was needed for preserving and flavoring elk and deer meat. A few soldiers at a time were stationed at this post near a Clatsop-Nehalem village in future Seaside, Oregon and the camp operated for about seven weeks from the first days of January until February 20, 1806. Approximately four bushels of salt were produced which the explorers calculated was enough for their winter here and the return river voyage to the United States.

The Saltmakers Return takes place Friday through Sunday, February 17-19. Historical Interpreters set up a camp right on the beach at the end of Avenue U in south Seaside. They make salt from seawater 24 hours a day from 9:00 am Friday through 5:00 pm Sunday. From Highway 101 take Avenue U to the beach. From the Promenade in Seaside, walk south to where Avenue U meets the beach.

The Saltmakers Return has received generous underwriting from the Kinsman Foundation, Meyer Memorial Trust, Autzen Foundation, the National Park Service Challenge Cost Share program, and the City of Seaside. Additional support is provided by the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial in Oregon, Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Association for Clatsop County, Oregon Historic Trails Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Public Broadcasting.

For more information, call Lewis and Clark NHP, Fort Clatsop at (503) 861-2471, ext 214 or contact the Seaside Museum and Historical Society at (503) 738-7065 or visit www.seasidemuseum.org.

Posted 14 February 2006. Download PDF of press release.


Construction To Begin At Fort Clatsop
Volunteers Needed To Help Build The Walls

Contact: Chip Jenkins, Superintendent (503) 861-4401

Starting on Wednesday, February 22, the logs walls of the new Fort Clatsop exhibit will begin to be assembled at the park site 6 miles south of Astoria, Oregon. Volunteers are needed to help carry the logs a short distance to the construction site.

Groups of 6 to 8 people using two handled log tongs (one person on each tong handle) will lift and carry a log approximately 200 feet to the fort site. People who wish to help must be able to lift and carry 60 pounds per person in order to properly and safely carry the logs.

“This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to be a park of creating history,” said Chip Jenkins Superintendent. “We hope that high school athletic teams, community groups, and families join us in bringing the logs to the site in a way similar to what the Corps of Discovery may have done.”

Volunteers are needed each afternoon and evening from February 22 through March 21 from after 4:00 PM until dark. Help is also needed during the day on weekends. The logs will be carried on a temporary trail from the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center parking lot to the site of the Fort Clatsop exhibit. Logs carried in the evening will be staged for placement by work crews on the following day. Approximately 400 logs will need to be moved. The logs are approximately 16 and 20 feet long, 8 to 10 inches in diameter and weigh approximately 300 pounds.

“The area around the construction site will be open and we want people to come out and watch the work on the new Fort.” Jenkins said. “We will have park rangers on hand to help answer questions and give programs.”

Thanks to over 425 volunteers working almost 1,600 hours these logs have already been debarked. Working at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds skilled National Park Service crews from Mount Rainier National Park have notched and fitted the logs together to form the walls of the new Fort Clatsop. The walls of the Enlisted Men’s quarters, one of two buildings that comprise the Fort Clatsop exhibit, have been completed. These walls were disassembled and trucked to a treatment facility on January 31. The logs will be delivered to the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center parking lot by February 22. The walls of the Officer’s Quarters will be completed by the end of February at which time they will be shipped for treatment and brought to the construction site by March 1st.

Walls for both structures will be up in time for the final Lewis and Clark Bicentennial event, The Return Home which will be March 23 to 26 at Fort Clatsop. A ceremony, marking the bicentennial of the Corps of Discovery’s departure from Fort Clatsop, the return of the walls of the new Fort Clatsop and the dedication of the new Netul River Trail will be on March 23.

People that would like to volunteer to help bring the logs of Fort Clatsop home need to schedule time to be part of the work crew. This will ensure that people will have a chance to help and make the best use of their valuable volunteer time. Volunteers can schedule their work time by contacting Park Ranger Bob Conway at (253) 569-4193 or (503) 861-4400 (leave a message). Volunteers are also needed to help with ranger lead programs, school programs and work in and around the visitor center. If people are interested in helping with ranger and education programs please contact the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park Volunteer Coordinator, Sally Freeman at (503) 861-4424.

“We could not run this park if it were not for the top-notch volunteers.” Jenkins said. “This is a great place to work if you enjoy meeting and talking with people, sharing history, and learning more about your national parks.”

Posted 9 February 2006. Download PDF of press release.


The Lewis and Clark Saltmakers Return!

February 17-19, 2006
9:00 a.m. Friday to 5:00 p.m. Sunday
Seaside, Oregon

Exactly 200 years ago this winter, members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition had a salt making camp about 15 miles from their Fort Clatsop headquarters. The salt was obtained from seawater by boiling the water away and was needed for preserving and flavoring elk and deer meat. A few soldiers at a time were stationed at this post near a Clatsop-Nehalem village in future Seaside, Oregon and the camp operated for about seven weeks from the first days of January until February 20, 1806. Approximately four bushels of salt were produced which the explorers calculated was enough for their winter here and the return river voyage to the United States.

This winter you can experience history by meeting the Lewis and Clark Saltmakers as they return to Seaside. As part of the Lewis and Clark Expedition Bicentennial, a special living history program, “The Saltmakers Return" takes place this February 17-19. Historical Interpreters will set up a camp right on the beach in south Seaside. They will make salt from seawater 24 hours a day from 9:00 a.m. Friday through 5:00 p.m. Sunday. The Saltmakers will be on the beach at the west end of Avenue U in Seaside, Oregon. From Highway 101 take Avenue U to the beach. From the Promenade in Seaside, walk south to where Avenue U meets the beach.

“The Saltmakers Return” is a fun interactive learning opportunity for the whole family. Visitors to this 56-hour event are encouraged to talk and trade with members of the expedition while these soldiers are tending fires and boiling seawater to make salt. "This holiday weekend is a great chance for families to see first hand what life for the Corps of Discovery was like on the Pacific Coast." said Chip Jenkins, Superintendent. "Regardless of the weather, kids really enjoy the chance to talk and trade with members of the expedition."

This popular program which generally occurs on the third weekends of July and August attracts nearly 6,000 visitors each year.
In 2001 the Seaside Museum and Historical Society approached the park in hopes of establishing a partnership to make “The Saltmakers Return” happen. Other partners in this program now include The Tides Motel, Fort Clatsop Historical Association, Destination: The Pacific, Clatsop County, and Oregon State Parks.

The Saltmakers Return has received generous underwriting from the Kinsman Foundation, Meyer Memorial Trust, Autzen Foundation, the National Park Service Challenge Cost Share program, and the City of Seaside. Additional support is provided by the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial in Oregon, Oregon Historic Trails Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Public Broadcasting.

For more information, call Lewis and Clark NHP, Fort Clatsop at (503) 861-2471, ext 214 or contact the Seaside Museum and Historical Society at (503) 738-7065.

Posted 6 February 2006. Download PDF of press release.


Lewis and Clark National Historical Park
News Release

January 12, 2006

Contact: Chip Jenkins, Superintendent (503) 861-4401
Jay Watson, Student Conservation Association (510) 435-7937

Public Invited To Help Make History: Help To Prepare The Final Logs For Fort Clatsop

Fort Walls Are Taking Shape
Meyer Memorial Trust Provides Grant For Special Educational Programming
Information and Educational Programming Starts This Weekend

This weekend the weather outside may be frightful. But in the main arena of the Clatsop County Fairgrounds the sight will be delightful. Thanks to the help of over 260 volunteers and skilled workers from the National Park Service the walls of the new Fort Clatsop are taking shape. This weekend volunteers are needed to help prepare the last 50 logs that will be used in the construction of the new Fort Clatsop exhibit.

“This weekend is a great chance for parents, grandparents and kids to come out and be a part of rebuilding Fort Clatsop.” said Chip Jenkins, Superintendent of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park. “People can come and work for 20 minutes or two hours, as short or as long as they like. We just want people to feel a part of the fort rebuild.”

To help connect people to the rebuilding of Fort Clatsop the National Park Service has partnered with the Student Conservation Association (SCA) and Meyer Memorial Trust. A generous grant from the Meyer Memorial Trust in Portland enabled the SCA to deploy a three-person intern team to the park to coordinate public education and involvement efforts in the rebuilding of the fort. The intern team will be on site for six months, its members hail from Portland, Maryland, and Massachusetts. Crew members are available for interviews.

This weekend the SCA interns will be offering the first of ongoing education and information programs talking about the history, design and techniques used in building Fort Clatsop. These will be:
Saturday, Sunday and Monday (January 14, 15, &16)
1:30 PM to 2:30 PM
Main Arena of the Clatsop County Fairgrounds.

“We hope that people will come out to see the work that is going on, take pictures, ask questions and watch history in the making.” Said Jenkins. “You do not have to work on the logs to visit the fort construction site. And, with the help of the SCA Interns we do hope that you have fun.”

The Student Conservation Association is a national organization dedicated to serving youth, the land, and community through hands-on conservation service. SCA programs foster youth leadership, inspires lifelong stewardship and citizenship, and enhances outdoor-related benefits to communities.

Work on fitting the logs together to create the walls of the new fort is proceeding on schedule. The walls of the enlisted men’s quarters are now head high and work on this structure should be completed by the end of January. Work has also begun on the officer’s quarters and should be completed by the end of February. Once each structure is completed the walls will be disassembled and trucked to a plant to be treated with preservatives. Once the treatment is completed the logs will be trucked to the Fort Clatsop unit of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park and they will be assembled to build the new Fort. The walls are expected to be assembled in time for the Return Home commemoration scheduled for the weekend of March 23rd. The public will be able to come to the park, see the fort and watch the onsite construction. The fort exhibit is expected to host ranger lead programs for the peak summer season.

People are invited out to the Clatsop County Fairgrounds to see the construction underway, talk with park staff and help with the work.
The Clatsop County Fairgrounds are located approximately 4 miles south of Astoria on Hwy 202. From Hwy 101 roundabout on the west end of Astoria take Hwy 202 south. Follow the signs to the Fairgrounds.

If you have a group that you would like to bring to work on the fort reconstruction people should contact the Fort Rebuild Project Manager, Pete Field, at (503) 861-4402 to schedule a time and work out logistics. Volunteers are also needed to help with the interpretation and answering questions. If people are interested in helping to volunteer either at the Fairgrounds or at the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center to help with public information please contact the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park Volunteer Coordinator, Sally Freeman at (503) 861-4424.

Posted 13 January 2006. Download PDF of press release.


Press Release Archive

2006 Press Releases

Corps of Discovery II posted on 27 April 2006. Download press release.

Posted 19 April 2006. Download PDF of Tamástslikt Cultural Institute events. Download Odyssey West event press release.

Posted 4 April 2006. An artwork spanning 450 miles begins to unfold, bringing together art and nature, peoples and cultures. April 22 Event at Cape Disappointment State Park, Washington, Celebrates Achievement of the First of Seven Permanent Installations by Artist Maya Lin. Download PDF of press release.

Posted 22 March 2006. An Opening to Close: Port of Portland and National Park Service Will Dedicate a New Historic Trail as Oregon’s Celebration of the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Comes to an End. Download PDF of press release.

Posted 23 February 2006.Corps of Discovery II opens 2006 tour in St. Helens, OR. Download PDF of press release.

Posted 14 February 2006. Seaside Post Office offers a special stamp cancellation. Download PDF of press release.

Posted 9 February 2006. Construction To Begin At Fort Clatsop. Download PDF of press release.

Posted 6 February 2006. The Lewis and Clark Saltmakers Return! Download PDF of press release.

Posted 13 January 2006: Public Invited To Help Make History: Help To Prepare The Final Logs For Fort Clatsop. Download PDF of press release.

2005 Press Releases

Posted November 28, 2005: The National Council of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Circle of Tribal Advisors (COTA) has released the final two Public Service Announcements in its cultural awareness campaign. Timed to coincide with National American Indian Heritage Month (November), the campaign invites viewers to experience and celebrate vibrant American Indian cultures. News release.

Corps of Discovery II in Vancouver posted November 22, 2005. Download PDF of press release. Link to Tent of Many Voices schedule.

Corps of Discovery II in Seaside posted November 21, 2005. Download PDF of press release. Link to Tent of Many Voices schedule.

Fort Clatsop Rebuild posted November 7, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

Currents of Change posted October 31, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

Destination: The Pacific - "Ocian in View" speaker series announces new program for November; tickets available online. Posted October 18, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

Hikes/events retrace Lewis and Clark’s 13-day adventure in the Columbia Gorge. Posted October 11, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

Interior Presents Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Program, Museum Exhibit Open to the Public - September 20, 2005. Posted September 20, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

September news from the Fort-To-Sea Trail. Posted September 20, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

Lincoln City exploration and chowder cook-off on November 12, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

LAKE OSWEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY TO SPONSOR AN OREGON CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAM FROM THE OREGON COUNCIL FOR THE HUMANITIES. August 12, 2005. Download PDF of press release.

ENCOUNTER AT NICHÁQWLI. July 20, 2005. Download PDF of press release. Download event brochure (PDF)

UNITED STATES MINT LAUNCHES “OCEAN IN VIEW” NICKEL. July 15, 2005. Download PDF of press release; download U.S. Mint Media Advisory (PDF)

LEWIS AND CLARK SALTMAKERS RETURN! (PDF) - July 8, 2005

LEWIS & CLARK INTREPRETIVE SIGN PROJECT DEDICATED (PDF) - June 23, 2005

Lewis and Clark Explorer Shuttle Starts - Join us for the Journey to Fort Clatsop! (PDF) - June 7, 2005

Oregonians Get Together Down by the Riverside - May 9, 2005

Two Tribes to Commemorate 150th Anniversary of Treaty Signings in May and June (PDF) - May 6, 2005

Bonneville Lock and Dam celebrates Lewis and Clark in April (PDF) - April 5, 2005

Oregon Chorale April Show To Highlight Lewis & Clark’s Impact on Oregon (PDF) - February 7, 2005

Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Oregon at the State Capitol (PDF) - January 20, 2005

"Lewis and Clark return to Washington D.C. for Presidential Inaugural" - January 18, 2005

2004 Press Releases

Read about holiday events planned at Fort Clatsop: Holiday Open House (PDF) and "Wintering Over" First-Person Living History Program (PDF).

Bonnie Kahn's Wild West Gallery presents Two Views of Lewis and Clark From Native American Eyes. Opening Thursday, December 2: Works from Lillian Pitt and John Potter Illustrate Native American Perspective

Lillian Pitt Designs Pin to Commemorate Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Oregon

Wednesday, November 24, starting at 9 AM, 4th Grade Students from selected Pacific and Clatsop County schools help launch The Vote at Station Camp Online with special programs at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center in Ilwaco.

Destination: The Pacific launched a new website as it prepares for the one-year countdown to the nationally sanctioned Signature Event. Link to website.

President Bush Signs Bill To Create Lewis & Clark National Historical Park

The official expansion and renaming of Fort Clatsop National Memorial will be announced during a ceremony planned for November 12, 2004, at the park. Link to press release.

November 24, 2004, 4th Grade Students from selected Pacific and Clatsop County schools will help launch The Vote at Station Camp Online. Link to press release.

Lewis and Clark Cultural Weekend scheduled for the Long Beach Peninsula over November 12-14, 2004. Read press release.

New Exhibits Open at Fort Clatsop including two permanent displays - a traditional cedar canoe and "The Plants of the Lewis and Clark Expedition" highlighting the "discoveries" by the expedition. Also featured is a new traveling exhibit, "End of our Voyage" produced by the Washington State Historical Society.

Congress moves closer to awarding funds for the expansion of Fort Clatsop

Summer Shuttle Operations Come To an End, Winter Programs Start Important Historic Preservation Work To Begin on Replica Fort

Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Circle of Tribal Advisors Launches Public Awareness Campaign

Oregon National Guard - Lewis and Clark Presentations. Link to website about the National Guard's free Discovery Box presentations.

Lewis and Clark Cultural Weekend scheduled for the Long Beach Washington peninsula over November 12, 13 and 14, 2004.

National Park Service news release: Not Semantics - Commemorate vs. Celebrate

Lewis and Clark Saltmakers Return, July 16-18 and August 20-22, 2004.

Long Beach Peninsula will host a weekend of family activities complementing the United States Postal Service's first day of issue ceremony for the Lewis and Clark commemorative stamps. News release >>

Cape Disappointment and Fort Clatsop to host May 14 dedication ceremonies. Lewis and Clark begin new journey on USPS commemorative stamps. News release >>

Teachers eligible for Wallowa Workshop on Lewis and Clark among Northwest Indians.

Lewis & Clark Explorer Train tickets go on sale April 2, 2004.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and its Oregon Heritage Commission in conjunction with the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Oregon organization allocated $300,000 to 23 recipients to support commemorative projects associated with our nation’s Lewis & Clark Bicentennial.

Fort Clatsop National Memorial's next free guest speaker program.

The Oregon Tourism Commission & LCBO Release the 2004-2006 Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Marketing Plan.

New Timed Ticket System Starting for Fort Clatsop National Memorial: tickets now on sale for popular Lewis and Clark site; first phase of new shuttle system. (PDF file)

Live Life on the Edge ... of the 18th Century! Register for Field Camp of Instructions Offered by Fort Clatsop National Memorial, June 2004. (PDF file)

2003 Press Releases

Annual “Ocian In View” Lewis and Clark cultural weekend on the Long Beach Peninsula – from Pacific County Friends of Lewis & Clark (PDF file)

Lewis & Clark Explorer Train Begins Service Between Portland and Astoria

National Park Service Awards $195,000 to Oregon Programs

2002 Press Releases

4th Annual Morrow County Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Observation

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